Food Health
Posted: 16 October 2013 01:49 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I would like to hear your collective thoughts on the following article (WFS).

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/fats-full-story/

Specifically, the recommendations in the summary at the bottom of the article, excerpted here:

“The Bottom Line: Recommendations for Fat Intake
Although the different types of fat have a varied—and admittedly confusing—effect on health and disease, the basic message is simple: Out with the bad, in with the good. You can do this by choosing foods with healthy fats, limiting foods that are high in saturated fat, and avoiding trans fat. Here’s how to make it happen:

- Eliminate trans fats from partially hydrogenated oils. Food labels should say “0” (zero) on the line for trans fat; also scan the ingredient list to make sure it does not contain partially hydrogenated oils (food labeling laws allow food makers to have up to 0.5 grams of trans fat in a product but still list “0” on the line for trans fats). Fortunately, most food manufacturers have removed trans fats from their products. In restaurants, steer clear of fried foods, biscuits, and other baked goods, unless you know that the restaurant has eliminated trans fat (many already have).

- Limit your intake of saturated fats by cutting back on red meat and full-fat dairy foods. Try replacing red meat with beans, nuts, poultry, and fish whenever possible, and switching from whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods to lower fat versions, or just eating smaller amounts of full-fat dairy products, such as cheese. Don’t replace red meat with refined carbohydrates (white bread, white rice, potatoes, and the like).

- In place of butter, use liquid vegetable oils rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, in cooking and at the table. Olive oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, corn oil, peanut oil, and the like are great sources of healthy fat.

- Eat one or more good sources of omega-3 fats every day. Fish, walnuts, canola or soybean oil, ground flax seeds or flaxseed oil are excellent sources of omega-3 fats. Avocado is a great source of healthy unsaturated fats.

As you choose foods with healthy fat, and limit the amount of trans and saturated fats in your diet, keep in mind that replacing saturated fat with refined carbohydrates will not protect you against heart disease and may even raise your risk. But there is solid proof that replacing saturated fat with unsaturated fats will help lower your heart disease risk.”

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Murph

M - 195lbs - 5’10” - 39
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“Sometimes God calms the storm. At other times, he calms the sailor. And sometimes he makes us swim.”

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Posted: 16 October 2013 02:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Most of it makes sense to me. A couple points I’d like to make from a Paleo point of view:

1) Red meat: if you’re buying regular stuff at the store, then you want to go lean. If you’re buying naturally-raised and grass-fed, then it’s not a big deal. No real reason to avoid red meat in my opinion.

2) I see no issue with butter, especially if you’re using butter from grass-fed cows.

3) Vegetable oils: I avoid them at all costs. I only use two oils in my kitchen: olive oil if I’m eating it and coconut oil for cooking. I would especially avoid canola and corn oils (and any oils that have them in the mix) due to my desire to not eat GMO foods. Almost all corn and canola grown in the US these days is GMO. I ain’t touching it.

Hope that helps,

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Posted: 17 October 2013 08:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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my issue is the full fat dairy….well, and the red meat. I like red meat and whole milk. I also eat eggs regularly and cook them in butter and/or coconut oil. I use olive oil, but stopped using it for cooking when i read that it breaks down under heat. It seems I eat a lot of saturated fat. i wonder if i should be concerned about my health?

Good point to go lean on red meat since I can’t easily get grass fed beef.

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Murph

M - 195lbs - 5’10” - 39
CF DOB - Jan 2013

“Sometimes God calms the storm. At other times, he calms the sailor. And sometimes he makes us swim.”

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” MLK Jr.

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Posted: 17 October 2013 01:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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My first thought was that this tips are not fully up to date. I looked at the article and I could not find a publish date. Looking at the references there are none after 2012. That means that some of the results from recent summary studies have not been included here. What bothers me with these kind of articles is that they refer to a lot of single studies, that may or may not be of significance to your diet (the egg story is a good example on that). I have been reading up on some summaries lately, so I’ll try to add perspectives from them:

One of those recent studies did compare LCHF to low-fat diets e.g. and concluded that the fear, that the high amounts of saturated fats were dangerous, is un-grounded. Also it was apparent that the low-carb diets were most effective for short term weight loss, but no diet was significant in long term weight loss. When total health was considered the mediterranean diets had the best result, but if remember correctly it wasn’t that much of a difference there either.

From what I can recall the points on trans fats and omega-3 are absolutely correct. The point of replacing butter is somewhat correct, but also I would side with smithma7 here and propose olive oil or coconut oil. Probably rybs oil would be good too, because the amounts of monounsaturated fats are similar to olive oils. The other vegetable oils are high in polyunsaturated fats, who do break down when heated.

Cutting back on saturated fats by removing red meat and full-fat dairy is not a good recommendation though - it only applies if you are able to replace the energy by energy from other sources of fat (you even find that statement in the text!). Chances are you will eat other things that are worse than the saturated fat… Going for low-fat dairy products is probably not a good idea - several indications of this, though I think there are no summarizing studies that support this yet. The case for or against red meat is still quite unclear.

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