Out of Breath (gasp)
Posted: 26 July 2008 07:04 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Thanks so much for the WODs and the web site. I am really enjoying it and getting some fast results.

I’ve noticed that during workouts I never feel out of breath until I pause for a few seconds: then I’m gasping like a fish out of water. I’m not holding my breath while I complete the exercises and I’m not aware of the need to catch my breath; I’m just tiring but breathing normally until I pause.

So, should I slow down, and if so, will that decrease the training effect?
Does pausing like that when I’m tired and waiting till my breath returns to a more normal level make me stronger faster, or is this slowing my training gains? If I don’t pause at all will my workout be more effective?

Should I try to breath deeper and faster during the reps?

When I used to run regularly before I injured my feet from overtraining I used to measure my pulse to see if I was overtraining, should I check my pulse before and after workout to see if I am overdoing it?
I am 49 and trying to get back into shape.
Do you recommend a 5 minute cool down with little weight or effort to improve recovery? “Angie” left me feeling tired later in the day and it was such a short workout.

Sorry for all the questions, maybe someone else has the same concerns. Thanks for the input.
pwoneal

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Posted: 26 July 2008 10:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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If you did not feel like you are out of breath, it would not have the proper intensity.
One of the common things noticed over time is that you might as well get back to it
“pick up the Bar”,  “get on the bar”  because it just will NOT make it any better to wait.

That being said learning to control when you breath, and how will help your progress.

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Posted: 26 July 2008 10:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Can you video tape yourself doing a couple of the standard workouts.  ROM, intensity (being expressed as a function of power), load among other things can and do affect the metabolic impact of the wod’s.

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Posted: 26 July 2008 11:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Just read your “Angie” post.  Here are a couple of thoughts.  Angie is interesting, because it effectively illustrates how CF works as Rx’d.  Generally new people scale the workout or slog their way through it because they are unable muscularly to do the work required.  (This is not a statement about someone’s masculinity or a comment on their character, just an observation on how it is)  When a person reaches muscular failure they have to stop and let their muscles recover, allowing them time to lower their heart rate.  Another common way for newer people to deal with muscular fatigue is to shorten the range of motion on a movement.  In effect a push up no longer goes from chest to floor to full arm extension and abduction.  In essence instead of running a 400 M they run 350 and call it 400.  Both help people deal with muscle fatigue and both lower the power output, also lowering the amount of metabolic impact the work is having.

The first thing that happens with CF is a person gets strong enough to actually do the work.  Then they get strong enough to do the work so that it has a metabolic effect.  Most people go a long time before this occurs because they approach this with ego.  The workout Angie is a metabolic workout.  Our firebreathers do the entire thing with two trainers watching form and ROM in 13:00.  They will start with a set of 50 pull ups.  drop off rest 10 seconds, do 25, drop of rest 10 seconds, do 15, then 10.  then it is on to push ups.  It is a sprint.

Most people approach training for this with ego.  They want to be able to say I did it as Rx’d .  Which means nothing to a longtime CrossFitter.  We want to see what your average power output is.  If I were training you I would not want you to go up in numbers until you had done the puppy workout with great form in half the time.  Once you had done that I would have you cycle through it twice and see if you could get close to your original time but doing twice the work.  Then I would have you double the numbers of the original puppy workout and run you straight through. And so on, slowly building up to Angie as Rx’d as a sprint.

As an aside to answer your original question, what you are experiencing is not unusual.  Exercise, especially heavy multi joint lifting, is a breathing regulator.  I could probably find the reason on line, but from observation I can tell you that almost everyone has this happen.  Interestingly the opposite also occurs.  When you are gasping for breath coming off the bar for the third set of Fran, the best thing you can do is pick up the bar and start the thrusters.

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Posted: 28 July 2008 09:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Thank you BlueBugofJustice and Garddawg for your quick, informative replies. I printed it and will absorb it to get all I can.

I think I remember now, that the exercise regulating the breathing might come from the muscles helping to push blood back to the heart and when I stop moving, the heart is left doing extra work, so perhaps a warmdown would help with that.

I am working on the ego part and have started to notice a little better progress already.
Not sure if I can video my workout, but I will take to heart your advice on great form first then 1/2 time, then cycling thru 2 times in about the same time as originally for once. Then doing double my original numbers (40, 40, 40, 50!). This is going to take a lot of patience and time—“Angie” will only come around about once a month?
I have noticed that strength is my first barrier to completing these workouts, and I don’t think I’ve been getting the metabolic effect so well yet. So I will take your approach on “Angie” and try to apply it to all my workouts.

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Posted: 18 September 2012 03:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Ok I know this is an old thread but it’s a good illustration of a question I have about Crossfit.  Being just a couple of month’s into this (and loving it!) I was wondering about the scaling and what GD mentioned.  In the section where he mentions if he (GD) was training you he’d have you work at the Puppy level for time, then work to do 2 rounds of Puppy until you could do it in the same original Puppy time and so on to different scaling levels etc. (if I understood that right).  Ok I get that, but if I follow the main site WOD’s, where do I work in that type of progression, because I don’t see the main site ever offering that type of progression / scaling (or CFBX) ?  Does that make sense?

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Posted: 18 September 2012 04:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Well, not sure exactly what you’re saying.  Also, I’ve been around the boards a while and don’t recall GD saying that (though I may have just missed it.). 

I’ll give you another way to approach these wods if you’re interested in bumping up a scaling.

1) Scalings are not grades.  You don’t have to do a puppy scaling simply because that’s where you are on some of them.  I use myself as an example: I’ve never scaled a 5k, but I almost always have to scale Fran, Diane, Helen, etc.

2) Next time you are repeating a scaling, you have a choice: same scaling as before, and go faster, or try to bump weight/reps upward.  Your choice.  Me, I like to try for an easy win and do the same scaling and try and crush it. 

3) You spend your first six months to a year gathering data so it makes the right scaling to choose a little tricky, so always go a little lower so you can go faster…

And as always: Form, consistency, then intensity. 

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Posted: 18 September 2012 05:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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TP,

I think BrownDawg is refering to post #3 in this same thread where GD says

If I were training you I would not want you to go up in numbers until you had done the puppy workout with great form in half the time.  Once you had done that I would have you cycle through it twice and see if you could get close to your original time but doing twice the work.  Then I would have you double the numbers of the original puppy workout and run you straight through. And so on, slowly building up to Angie as Rx’d as a sprint.

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Posted: 19 September 2012 04:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Yes that is exactly what I was referring to.  I guess another way to look at it is that the post mentioned above talks about doing Angie well and doing variations of it.  How does that approach fit into the daily WOD’s?  Is it a substitute workout, an additional one…?

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Posted: 19 September 2012 05:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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BrownDawg - 19 September 2012 04:03 PM

Yes that is exactly what I was referring to.  I guess another way to look at it is that the post mentioned above talks about doing Angie well and doing variations of it.  How does that approach fit into the daily WOD’s?  Is it a substitute workout, an additional one…?

It doesn’t.  You’d have to fit it in.
You need to remember that most of the time GD is coaching people in his CrossFit gym.
When he programs Angie there he would use the sort of progression he mentioned with an athlete he’s working with in the gym. So you won’t see him or the mainsite recommending this for a largely anonymous group of athletes he isn’t working with personally.
When you do the scaled workouts you are the Coach. It’s up to you to manage your progress through the progressions, although we do give you some guidelines on that to avoid the worst errors we see.

AS your own Coach, when Angie comes up you’d look at your Angie performance last time and choose whether you do Puppies as Rx’ed, a double Puppies, move up, or some other method of managing your progress through the scalings.

I believe that the underlying message is the basic CF formula of Mechanics, Consistency, Intensity.
First learn how to do it right (do Puppies all the way through in half the time), then be able to do it right repeatedly (double Puppies in the target time), then up the intensity (move up a level).

The idea being that the goal is not a headlong rush toward Rx’ed, it’s being able to move well while doing functional movements at high intensity.

The two occurrences of Angie wouldn’t be any closer together at Brand X than on mainsite. They could be weeks, months or even a year apart. You would develop your capacity in Angie not by becoming an Angie specialist and repeatedly doing it, but by building capacity using the other CF workouts which would transfer to Angie when it came up.

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Posted: 20 September 2012 02:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Perfect Thanks!

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