Programming: Should I be doing something else as well as Crossfit - aka “That’s all there is?”
Posted: 10 August 2008 03:42 PM   [ Ignore ]
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It’s covered in the mainsite FAQs http://www.crossfit.com/cf-info/faq.html#General3, but here’s our take on this question.

Actually, I’m going to lift a quote Kempie made in the this post; http://www.crossfitbrandx.com/index.php/forums/viewthread/4777/#65547
It says it better than anything else I’ve seen.

kempie - 15 August 2008 01:33 AM

There are folks doing extra work and it’s very clear after even a short time that they are digging themselves into a hole, quickly.  On the other hand there are folks who seem to have magical powers and do extra work, hammer the WOD and do this day after day, month after month.  I’m gonna go out on a limb here and say the second category is the result of a long slow build up in work capacity.  What started out as managing to stand upright after a WOD moved to a little skillwork.  After some months that wasn’t enough, a short ME session in the morning was manageable.  A little later, well that skill work wasn’t enough - how about we sneak some rowing in there cos those banjo’s are getting louder ... and we won’t mention painstorm wink

But seriously, one baby step at a time as your capacity to recover improves and also as you have the ability to identify and target weaknesses.  Most folks that come into CF have that many weaknesses that to focus on even a small percentage would leave no time for the WOD.  Just do the WOD, let everything get better at it’s own pace and see where your real weaknesses lie when things start to slow down.  For most folks you are gonna have a long run before that happens.

For those folks that think that the WOD ain’t enough I would suggest the following.

Do the CFWU - scale it at the start, remember it’s a warm-up but work until you can do the full monty and just feel loose and ready for your workout.

Hammer your WOD - Fran in 5 minutes is a whole different beast to 20 minutes.  Scale so you can go hard and blast it.  Keep notes so you can track your progress (Check JDG’s posts for how that is done)

Identify one or two gymnastic skills you want to improve and work on them afterwards.  Handstands, kipping pull-ups, hollow rocks?  Your choice.

Or how about the olympic lifts, do you have your front squat and overhead squat down?  Your deadlift?  If yes then start working through the Burgener warm-up.  If no then check the resources on crossfit.com, practice and post some vid for us to look at.  An empty bar is the most you need here folks, but start with PVC and only move up a little when the movement is as good as you can get it

With the above I would say there is easily enough to keep everyone busy without beating down the body with other silly stuff you don’t yet need or are not ready for.

Cheers, kempie

Having said that, if you compete in a sport, or just plain like a physical activity like running or cycling, by all means keep it up!

Crossfit is supposed to prepare you for life and all its enjoyments.

Just don’t think you need to be adding anything to Crossfit to improve your fitness. It does that just fine plain and unadorned.

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Craig Massey


“The point of CF is to get better at life.  Being unable to workout tomorrow because you were pigheaded today is not in line with our goals.”
Garddawg - 22 March 2009

“CrossFit is not dangerous.
Bad coaching is dangerous, poor movement is dangerous. Ego is dangerous.
CrossFit, properly scaled to the individual is the safest and most efficient program available for strength, conditioning and movement.”
BlueBugofJustice - 18 August 2009

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Posted: 29 September 2008 03:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Just carrying on from Metric’s comment above.

Crossfit is excellent for enhancing your fitness for other sports.  For sports where you are in control of your fitness and skill/ sport specific work it is really easy to fit the two together.  Generally the result is that strength and conditioning is taken care of by Crossfit and your shorter more focussed practice sessions take care of the sport specific stuff. 

Problems arise when you do not have personal control over your training as is often the case with team sports.  Quite often the line between conditioning and skill work is blurred and in an extended practice session you will get hit with a bit of both.  In this scenario, you have a few options:

1 - speak to the coach, explain what you are doing for your conditioning and get a waiver from team fitness work.  Not great from a team standpoint but will allow you to keep a pretty high CF workload.  I would suggest that this is only conceivable if your fitness and conditioning is way above your other non-Crossfitting team mates.
2 - speak to the coach, explain what you are doing for your conditioning.  If the coach is receptive see if it can be taken on at a team level. 
3 - if your coach is not receptive to Crossfit in any way then you’re gonna have to suck it up and do your team’s training.  Maybe you can sneak in a little Crossfit but your team training has to be a priority so short and sharp will be the key.  Feel free to ask on the boards for ideas about how to do this.  Also, make the most of your off season to jack up your capacity.

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Posted: 29 September 2008 06:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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And for all you skinny endurance types . . . there’s this:

http://www.crossfitendurance.com/

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Posted: 27 October 2009 02:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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And something from Garddawg
http://www.crossfitbrandx.com/index.php/forums/viewreply/62321/

Garddawg - 23 July 2008 08:02 AM

Couple of quick thoughts.  I read once a quote, “It is better to be 10% undertrained than 1% overtrained.”  When training more is not better.  We have found that our best responses come from the short brutal workouts.  Secondly, most people who avoid the heavy work really are not lifting heavy when they do try it.  Let me try to explain.  Becoming stronger is not just about the muscles being stronger.  In fact that has very little to do with a max squat or deadlift.  Your bodies ability to recruit more muscle fibers for the task is equally important.  The bodies vaso and lymp adaptions are also important, although less so for fat burning. 
A newbie lifter, lifting a 5 rep max back squat, will rerack the weight and say that was hard, feeling some tiredness in their legs.  A longtime lifter doing a max set of 5 back squats will rerack the weight, legs shaking, shoulders and back quaking, lungs bursting, panting, out of breath, and sweating like they’ve just run the mile.  For the newbie, the lift might be compared to running a fast 800, it was hard, but for the experienced lifter it is like running interval 100’s.  Everything hurts.

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Craig Massey


“The point of CF is to get better at life.  Being unable to workout tomorrow because you were pigheaded today is not in line with our goals.”
Garddawg - 22 March 2009

“CrossFit is not dangerous.
Bad coaching is dangerous, poor movement is dangerous. Ego is dangerous.
CrossFit, properly scaled to the individual is the safest and most efficient program available for strength, conditioning and movement.”
BlueBugofJustice - 18 August 2009

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Posted: 28 April 2012 03:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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And from http://www.crossfitbrandx.com/index.php/forums/viewthread/11297/#213716:

Metric - 13 September 2010 08:21 PM

Well if you’re doing scaled mainsite WODs the rest days are built in, the cycle is 3 on (WOD days), one off (rest day).
A common recommendation is that you start out doing 1 on, one off for 2-3 weeks and then go to 2 on, 1 off for 2-3 weeks then 3 on one off.

It really depends on how fit you are when you start.


Something to watch out for though is that this stuff is much more intense than you might expect and people who start out all bouncy find they’re dragging themselves around after 3 weeks or so. It creeps up on you.

On your rest days do as much or as little as you please. Active rest is encouraged, which means playing sports, walking, hiking, gardening, basically living your life. Rest doesn’t mean the couch and a remote, it just means no crossfit. Alright, you can read about CF and watch videos, but that’s it. grin If you like running, run, if you like swimming, swim. Your call.
Mobility work is always good, rest days or not and it’s something you can do as extra work right from the start.

Skill work? Probably OK on a rest day so long as it is skill work. Olympic lifts with PVC or a broomstick for example. Practising muscle-ups? Maybe not unless you can already do 15 or so at a trot.
Unless you’re following behind the mainsite a few days you never know what could come up in the next WOD and way too many people have found that their skill work comes up as the next workout.

The best suggestion I can make is what I’ve already implied, for the first 3 weeks take it easy and go very light. Once you’ve gone that far you’ll have established whether your workload will make you hit the wall at that 3 week mark. If it does, you need to give yourself more time before you add extra work. If it didn’t you’re clear to add more. And of course you need to constantly monitor that as your ability to bring more intensity to the workout increases.
Overtraining can happen at any time and it’s sneaky. It’s there before you know it.

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Craig Massey


“The point of CF is to get better at life.  Being unable to workout tomorrow because you were pigheaded today is not in line with our goals.”
Garddawg - 22 March 2009

“CrossFit is not dangerous.
Bad coaching is dangerous, poor movement is dangerous. Ego is dangerous.
CrossFit, properly scaled to the individual is the safest and most efficient program available for strength, conditioning and movement.”
BlueBugofJustice - 18 August 2009

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